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Tuesday, 30 August 2011

Ipoh Jaya : 炸油条(Fried Dough)

handmade fried dough / morning breakfast
自製油條 / 油炸鬼
油炸鬼,中原及北方人叫佢做油條,係中國傳統嘅民間小食,佢其實係一種油炸嘅麪粉團。
佢嘅製法亦都好簡單,只係將小塊麪粉團拉長,中間用刀背微微咁印一吓(等佢炸完後好似有兩條嗤埋咁),跟住放入滾油度炸,炸至麪粉團漲起,色澤變成金黃,形狀變到好似一段脛骨咁,就可以撈起上架擺賣。油炸鬼有時會同粥一齊食。
油炸鬼原本係叫做油炸檜;檜即係宋朝時代一個被公認為奸相嘅秦檜;而油炸檜就係後人因為勁憎呢個奸相曾經設計陷害忠臣岳飛,恨佢做禍國殃民嘅事,於是創作呢種民間小食嚟發洩,寓意秦檜同佢老婆死咗之後除咗希望佢哋落地獄之外,重要俾閰羅王放佢哋落滾油度炸嚟懲罰佢。由於係咒佢哋兩公婆,所以油炸鬼一定係好似有兩條嗤埋咁樣。
後來呢隻嘢食嘅名喺歷史上一路流傳,演變成今時今日嘅油炸鬼。而油炸鬼係外國亦俾人叫做Chinese Donut(中國冬甩),因為佢同冬甩一樣都係炸嘢。
另一種講法係油條傳到落福建,閩南話稱為「油炸粿」或「油押粿」,廣東人聽到就直接叫做「油炸鬼」(油炸鬼同油押粿同音,就如炒粿條變成炒鬼刁或炒貴刁




Youtiao (simplified Chinese: 油条; traditional Chinese: 油條; pinyin: yóutiáo; literally "oil strip") - also known as you char kway in Hokkien,[1] yau ja gwai in Cantonese,[2] and Chinese oil stick, Chinese donut, Chinese cruller,[3] fried bread stick- is a long, golden-brown, deep fried strip of dough in Chinese cuisine and other East and Southeast Asian cuisines and is usually eaten for breakfast. Conventionally, youtiao are lightly salted and made so they can be torn lengthwise in two. Youtiao are normally eaten as an accompaniment for rice congee or soy milk





soy milk with fried dough 
the best chioce

In Singapore and Malaysia, it is known in English as you char kway, you char kuay, or u char kway, transliterations of its local Hokkien (Minnan) name (油炸粿 iû-chiā-kóe). It is rendered in Malay as cakoi, a corruption of the Minnan term, "char kway". The Malay version comes with various fillings, which are either sweet, such as red bean paste or savoury, such as sardines fried in tomato sauce. The plain version is usually eaten with the coconut and egg jam kaya. Cakoi is usually sold in morning street markets or "pasar malam" night markets.
It is also normally served with Bak kut teh or rice congee, sliced thinly to be dipped into the broth/congee and eaten. Usually Malaysians and Singaporeans like to serve together with coffee or soy milk for breakfast.